Tag: financial aid counseling


New York’s Free College Program May Be Lottery-Based

Posted on May 11th, 2017

When the Excelsior Scholarship Program was announced, many believed it meant that the majority of students in New York state would now be able to attend college for free.

That’s not entirely the case, as we explain in our recent post about the program. And more details have emerged that should give pause to students and families depending on this program.

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What you need to know about New York’s Excelsior Scholarship Program

Posted on April 24th, 2017

Many of our clients have been asking about the new Excelsior Scholarship program, which will provide free tuition at in-state public colleges for New York state students if their family meets certain income requirements.

While it may sound too good to be true, there are a lot of important details and things you need to keep in mind when considering the program. Read these important FAQs about the program, and contact us if you want personalized help figuring out whether it is a good option for your family.

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How to Fill Out the FAFSA When You Have More Than One Child in College

Posted on February 6th, 2017

When you have multiple kids in college, filling out the FAFSA can be tricky. Luckily, the Department of Education put together a guide to answer your most pressing questions.

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1 in 5 students don’t apply for financial aid

Posted on August 12th, 2016

We write often about the importance of applying for financial aid, even if you don’t think you’re qualified to receive it.

But a new study from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) found that 1 in 5 students don’t apply for financial aid at all.

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Private colleges offer record-high tuition discounts

Posted on May 27th, 2016

"There’s almost no one who’s paying 100%." -- Economist Lucie Lapovsky

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Podcast: How to win private scholarships for college

Posted on May 12th, 2016

"Why get loans or pay out of your own pocket when you can get someone else to invest in your or your child’s education?" -- J.R. Vasquez

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What you need to know before taking out student loans

Posted on May 5th, 2016

Your student loan debt can affect your credit, which affects whether you’ll be able to buy a car, house or take out a loan in the future.

But a new study shows nearly half of all student loan borrowers don’t know that, according to CNBC.

Before taking out student loans, it’s important to educate yourself about the types of student loans and understand how interest and repayment work so that you can put yourself in a good position to repay them in the future.

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Treating students as stocks, investors front college tuition

Posted on April 4th, 2016

With college costs higher than ever before, and families taking on more debt to pay for college, some students have sought alternative routes to finance their education.

Some students are now using income-share agreements, or ISAs, to help pay for college. With an ISA, students get money from investors and they agree to pay a percentage of their future income to those investors over a set period of time.

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Parents, students face issues completing FAFSA with new FSA ID

Posted on March 7th, 2016

"Because of barriers like this, if they can’t get their FAFSAs done, kids cannot go to college because they cannot pay for college." -- Marie Groark

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How to get the most financial aid possible

Posted on March 4th, 2016

There are many factors that determine financial aid eligibility, and it can be difficult to know how much aid you’ll get before you apply.

With college being such a large investment, it’s important to do research and understand how financial aid is determined before applying to colleges in order to maximize your financial aid package.

In a recent segment on Time Money, Lynnette Khalfani-Cox, author of College Secrets: How to Save Money, Cut College Costs and Graduate Debt Free, explains how to maximize your financial aid, the difference between merit and need-based aid, and why you should fill out the FAFSA even if you don’t think you’ll qualify for aid.

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